See below for commonly asked questions about implementing Street Law's Legal Life Skills Program. Still can't find an answer to your question? Please contact Yolanda Johnson

Starting a Program

  1. How do I start a Legal Life Skills Program at my organization/agency?
  2. How much does it cost to start a Legal Life Skills Program?
  3. How does Street Law find Legal Life Skills Program participants?
  4. How does Street Law identify program sites?
  5. Is there evidence that this program works? 

Program Roles

  1. Who teaches the lessons?
  2. Can I volunteer to teach at a Legal Life Skills Program site? Do I need to be trained?
  3. What role do the participants play in the program?

Training

  1. Does Street Law offer training? 
  2. How long is the training?
  3. What does the training cover?
  4. Does the training qualify as professional development for staff?

Program Assistance

  1. Can Street Law help me find volunteers for my program?
  2. Can Street Law staff speak to my students/youth about their rights or at a school assembly?

Starting a Program

1. How do I start a Legal Life Skills Program at my organization/agency?

There are two ways:

  1. You may purchase lessons from our Legal Life Skills Lessons Library and use them to start your own program without assistance from Street Law, Inc.
  2. You may contract with Street Law to help you design and implement a program. Our services include training staff and/or volunteers; providing implementation assistance, program observation, and ongoing technical assistance; and supplying curriculum from the Legal Life Skills Lesson Library. This formal program arrangement requires the organization/agency to sign a memorandum of understanding (MOU) and make a financial contribution to share in the costs of implementing the program.

2. How much does it cost to start a Legal Life Skills Program?

Street Law, Inc. is a nonprofit organization that operates on grants and contributions from corporations, law firms, individuals, organizations, and foundations. 
Organizations that formally partner with Street Law to obtain training, assistance, and curriculum are asked to make a financial contribution to share in the costs of implementing the program. The size of the contribution varies based on the needs and situation of each organization. Please reach out to Yolanda Johnson for help determining the size of your contribution. 

3. How does Street Law find Legal Life Skills Program participants?

Street Law does not recruit Legal Life Skills Program participants. Instead, we partner with organizations/agencies that serve vulnerable youth and adults and help them design and implement a program that meets the unique needs of the people they serve.   

4. How does Street Law identify program sites?

We identify sites by reaching out to organizations/agencies that serve vulnerable youth and adults, including:

  • Youth in the juvenile justice system
  • Youth in the child welfare system
  • Crossover youth who are impacted by multiple systems
  • Re-entry youth and adults
  • LGBTQ+ youth
  • Homeless youth and adults
  • Youth in alternative education settings
  • Girls and young women
  • Survivors of domestic violence

In particular, we look for community-based organizations or government agencies that:

  • have been in operation for at least two years
  • can produce evidence of impact, including stories/anecdotes 
  • display participant-centered program strategies
  • have a positive reputation in their community 
  • align with Street Law’s vision to achieve a just and fair world powered by people who are informed, skilled, and engaged in improving their lives, communities, and governments

5. Is there evidence that this program works? 

Street Law has collected evidence in the form of participant surveys, stories, and other qualitative data that shows the Legal Life Skills Program has a positive effect on the vulnerable populations it serves.

We are working toward collecting more evidence-based data. In the meantime, we encourage you to explore:

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Program Roles

1. Who teaches the lessons?

The lessons are designed to be taught by staff of community organizations and government agencies who work with:

  • Youth in the juvenile justice system
  • Youth in the child welfare system
  • Crossover youth who are impacted by multiple systems
  • Re-entry youth and adults
  • LGBTQ+ youth
  • Homeless youth and adults
  • Youth in alternative education settings
  • Girls and young women
  • Survivors of intimate partner violence

They may also be taught by volunteers from the legal community, including lawyers, legal professionals, and law students.  

2. Can I volunteer to teach at a Legal Life Skills Program site? Do I need to be trained?

At some Legal Life Skills Program sites, the lessons are taught by volunteers from the legal community, including lawyers, legal professionals, and law students. You don’t need to be an attorney to volunteer.

We recommend that all volunteers be trained.

Contact Yolanda Johnson to see if there are any current volunteer opportunities in your area. 

3. What role do the participants play in the program?

Street Law believes that participants should be part of planning and implementation of the program. At each program site, a youth leader or participant advocate will represent their fellow program participants. They will have a voice in program design, lesson selection, and scheduling. They may also play a role in session preparation, assist volunteer instructors, and encourage peer participation.

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Training

1. Does Street Law offer training? 

Yes, for a fee, Street Law staff can travel to your area to train your staff/volunteers to implement the Legal Life Skills Program. Please contact Yolanda Johnson to learn more. 

2. How long is the training?

An average implementation training is four hours.  

3. What does the training cover?

Each training agenda will include sessions on the following topics:

  • Why Street Law?
  • Program and curriculum overview
  • Integrating Legal Life Skills lessons into your program
  • Involving participants in their own learning
  • Involving the community in participant learning
  • What makes a great Street Law session?
  • “Teach-backs”/practice delivering a Street Law strategy
  • How Street Law can support your program moving forward

4. Does the training qualify as professional development for staff?

This will vary depending on the organization, but generally, attending the Legal Life Skills Program implementation training will allow an employee to obtain a specialty service to teach Street Law lessons in addition to their normal work requirements. Street Law will provide documentation, upon request, to participants who complete the training.

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Program Assistance

1. Can Street Law help me find volunteers for my program?

Street Law is happy to assist with volunteer recruitment if your site has a signed memorandum of understanding (MOU) in place with us. 

2. Can Street Law staff speak to my students/youth about their rights or at a school assembly?

No, sorry, Street Law does not provide speakers for events like this.

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