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Helping Kids Help Themselves

Helping Kids Help Themselves

In 1967, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that juveniles accused of crimes have the right to due process protections under the 14th Amendment, including the right to an attorney.

Helping Kids Help Themselves

Independent producer Shea Shackelford visits Street Law in Washington, D.C., for a workshop which teaches first time juvenile offenders about their rights.

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The Gault Decision

In 1967, 15-year-old Gerald Gault was sentenced to six years in prison for making a lewd phone call, without written notice of the charges, witnesses, or an attorney. In its landmark decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that juveniles accused of crimes have the right to due process protections under the 14th Amendment, including the right to an attorney. But today in some parts of the country a disturbing number of juveniles waive their right to an attorney, leading some to argue that the justice system has not made adequate progress in implementing these protections. Join us on this edition of Justice Talking as we look at what In re Gault has meant for juvenile justice over the last 40 years and ask if today's system does enough to protect young defendants.

View the entire Justice Talking episode: Juvenile Justice 40 Years After In Re Gault.

Source: Justice Talking (Reproduced with permission)

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Juvenile Justice

Save Our Streets

Topic: U.S. Supreme Court

Topic: Underserved Youth

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